Canada Research Centre on Inclusive Education

Alumni Research

Please click on the title of the paper to view the full abstract.

Baldwin, Michelle. (2008). Enablers and barriers of community service for youth with disabilities. Unpublished master's thesis, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario. J. Specht, supervisor.

A qualitative approach (i.e. 30 minute interviews) to explore the enablers and barriers from the students' perspective was initiated with students with learning disabilities.

Basa, Ruth. (2010). The assessment of basic language and learning skills (ABLLS-R) and teacher education for students with autism spectrum disorders. Unpublished master's thesis, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario. J. Specht, supervisor; J. Metsala, advisory committee.

The current study evaluated teacher perceptions of the Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (ABLLS-R) and its utility in creating specific and measurable communication goals for students with ASD.

Davidson, Katherine. (2011). The research to practice gap in the identification and instruction of students at risk for reading disabilities: Teachers' perspectives. Unpublished doctorial dissertaion, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario. E. Nowicki, supervisor. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository Paper 143. http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/143

This study investigated teachers' uses of research on the identification and instruction of students at risk for reading disabilities (RD). It identified obstacles to teachers' uses of RD research and methods to bridge RD research and teachers' practices.

McInnis, James (2013). Elementary school principals as leaders of inclusion for students with exceptionalities. Unpublished master's thesis, Faculty of Education, Brock University. T. Gallagher, supervisor.

This qualitative study profiled and discussed practices and beliefs of four elementary school principals in southern Ontario who are recognized leaders of inclusion for students with exceptionalities.

Pompeo, Michelle (2011). General education elementary teachers' perceptions of developing "interventionist" beliefs and practices. Unpublished doctorial dissertation, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario. J. Specht, supervisor. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository Paper 242. http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/242

This thesis investigates how "Interventionist", "general education" (GEN) teachers, (or "core" teachers, as opposed to special educators) in the elementary stream, in Ontario, have learned inclusive beliefs and practices that have been considered effective for teaching and including children with exceptionalities in their classrooms.

Puskarich, Meghan. (2009). Participation profiles: Measuring adolescents' engagement in school and extracurricular activities. Unpublished master's thesis, Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Western Ontario. J. Specht, advisory committee.

The participation of 18 Grade 8 students was studied through analysis of semi-structured interviews of students, parents, and teachers. The interviews focused on the students' daily activities, supports and barriers to participation, and descriptions of roles.

White, Matthew (2012). School re-entry protocols for children with acquired brain injury. Unpublished master's thesis, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository. Paper 569. http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/569

This study first looked at identifying any pre-existing school re-entry protocols. The study's main focus became constructing and evaluating an original school re-entry protocol. The protocol was designed through adherence to policy theory practices and accepted standards of practice found in the literature.

Young, Gabrielle. (2012). Examining students' use of assistive technology, self-concept and school motivation across school transitions. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario. J. Specht, Supervisor.

This mixed methods study followed 12 students (8 males and 4 females between 14 and 16 years of age) and their parents in order understand students' transition from a demonstration school into high schools, their assistive technology use in both school environments, and how these environments may have impacted their self-concept and school motivation.